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Amy Cox – Veneer

Changed my views on writing good characters.

I loved every single thing about this book. It was seamless, well-orchestrated, well-researched, the lingo was slick (unlike a lot of harder science fiction), the characters, the cities. AHh! It was just so very well put together like an intricate puzzle and worked out perfectly in the end.

The most powerful part, for me, is how it’s changed my views on how to write a good character. perhaps it’s because I was just reading a poor example this evening, but I realized that what a character looks like is inconsequential MOST of the time, and yet so many writers drag on and on about it.

Veneer changed that for me because the *veneer* is the important part. I can’t say much without giving away spoilers, but hopefully you’ll experience that shift as well.

Highly recommended.

And one aside, I didn’t notice if this was intended as a young adult novel, but the main characters are about 17 years old. There is crude language, violence, and sex. Just a heads up if that’s not your thing, or you don’t want *your* young adults reading that.

Recent Reviews

I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway. The writing was not remarkable, but the story was fast-paced and the characters were believable. I found myself being sucked in despite the fact that Verastiqui’s writing style wasn’t my favorite, and that takes a certain type of talent. If you are a sci-fi fan, you will love this book. I myself thought it was okay. Related

Hanna Jones – Por Vida

Incredible futuristic cautionary tale. I received a free copy of this book through Goodreads: First Reads. I really enjoyed Veneer quite a bit. It was very original and Daniel Verastiqui has created a realistic and very futuristic setting for the story. The characters really came alive due to Verastiqui’s eloquent writing and apparent insight into the minds of teenagers. The book isn’t a casual read but it’s well worth learning the lingo used in the book because it’s a very compelling story. As a cautionary tale for what might come in our future, it’s chilling—but also hopeful since having the Veneer technology would be really wonderful–and dangerous in the wrong hands. Technology often presents a double edged sword. There’s violence in this book and it’s a testament to Verastiqui’s skills that you feel so bad for the victims. The violent scenes are used to demonstrate the dangers of this future world and it works. You really wonder whether it’s better to buy-in or scram and go back to nature. This is an incredible book, and the paperback version has an amazing cover. I love the graphic design. It’s a true work of art. Related

David Ketelsen – Veneer
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui