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Tag: tropic of cancer

Arrestingly Beautiful

I don’t use the highlight feature on my Kindle very often, and when I do it’s usually for something funny or interesting I want to remember. Sometimes, it’s for a sentence or paragraph I find particularly literary and beautiful and poetic, though that is rare when reading contemporary works. Last night, after a shitty day to end all shitty days, I opened my Kindle to continue reading Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer and stumbled upon the most arrestingly beautiful line I think I’ve ever read.

Recommended Reading: The Introduction to Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer

The introduction to Tropic of Cancer was written by Karl Shapiro, an American poet who died in 2000. At first, I misread and thought the Intro was written by Anais Nin, which is the only reason I read it in the first place. I’d read her work, so I was curious to hear what she thought of Miller. Two pages into the Intro, I sank into a deep depression.

Recent Reviews

Set in the not-too-distant-future, this latest novel from Daniel Verastiqui takes the reader on an exciting ride! Accommodating elements of science fiction, action, drama, and humor, the author creates a riveting story with excellent twists and turns, leaving nary a dull moment. Numerous times I found myself doing the “Wow, I can’t stop there, I need to read the next chapter!” dance. Additionally, the content and style of the book does an admirable job of satiating a sci-fi fan like myself while maintaining an accessibility for the more casual reader. So what’s causing subbers to push the Perion City feeds through the ratings roof? Find out in Perion Synthetics!

Pearce Barry – Perion Synthetics

Daniel Verastiqui’s best book yet. I have read a couple of his books before, and was graced with an advanced copy. Perion Synthetics is his best book yet. He follows different characters, giving you a well rounded view of the futuristic world through many different lenses, leaving you frantically reading for more, unable to put the book down. Throughout the whole book, you are not only entertained with an interesting story, but left with a nagging thought of what is truly a human soul vs artificial intelligence, and what are its rights. I have dismissed such conversations before, but Perion Synthetics presents some realistic issues we may face in the not too distant future. For those needing to know more specifics for youths reading it: There is explicit language, sex, and violence. This may not be a book for people under 16. But for science fiction readers who don’t mind that like I do, this book is a great read. I recommend it for anyone’s library.

Lauren Ellis – Perion Synthetics
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