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Tag: politics

Redefining American Childhood

Thirty years ago, our family was stationed at Goodfellow Air Force Base in San Angelo, Texas. It was actually our second time there, and I remember my parents re-introducing me to friends I’d had when I was four or five years old. We all lived on a measly three streets, which are no longer tagged on Google Maps: Carswell, Vance Circle, and I forget the third. My friends and I explored every inch of that neighborhood and that base. And though I haven’t been back since 1991, I still remember it fondly, which was why it was so fucking horrible to hear Trump would be housing detained immigrants there.

An Artist’s Responsibility, IMHO

Last weekend, I was fortunate enough to spend the afternoon with a bunch of local writers, directors, and actors and discuss everything from when a child gets their first tooth to when a child takes their first step. It wasn’t lost on me that almost no one talked about their creative work–what they were writing, what they were directing, etc–which I found strange, because as an author, I’m always looking an excuse to talk about my books. I left the event feeling like I had rediscovered a group of people that I’m a part of but that I don’t spend time with. What really struck me, though, was how everyone there, as creatives, had a voice, and later, I realized, a responsibility.

Recent Reviews

All of this takes place in a world saturated and motivated by media. With implanted streams that go right into our brains. It takes place in more or less the present day in some alternate universe and even though some of the tech feels like it’s a few years out, it seems very plausible. This feels like speculative fiction.

Timothy Thomas – Perion Synthetics

Daniel Verastiqui’s best book yet. I have read a couple of his books before, and was graced with an advanced copy. Perion Synthetics is his best book yet. He follows different characters, giving you a well rounded view of the futuristic world through many different lenses, leaving you frantically reading for more, unable to put the book down. Throughout the whole book, you are not only entertained with an interesting story, but left with a nagging thought of what is truly a human soul vs artificial intelligence, and what are its rights. I have dismissed such conversations before, but Perion Synthetics presents some realistic issues we may face in the not too distant future. For those needing to know more specifics for youths reading it: There is explicit language, sex, and violence. This may not be a book for people under 16. But for science fiction readers who don’t mind that like I do, this book is a great read. I recommend it for anyone’s library.

Lauren Ellis – Perion Synthetics
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui