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Tag: Gottman

Die Antwoord vir Facebook

I’ve been listening to a lot of Die Antwoord lately because as a late-30s, married Hispanic male who only drives Japanese imports, I’m obviously their target demographic. Like every single one of my friends, I hadn’t heard of Die Antwoord until I saw them in Chappie. Then I checked out their music and got seriously hooked. Now I can’t stop watching their videos and blasting Doos Dronk every time I get the weepies. Wait, no, that doesn’t sound right. It was while listening to Doos Dronk for the 117 thousandth time that I boarded a train of thought that went straight to HateMyself-ville. I’ll explain.

Recent Reviews

Good book overall. This book was pretty good overall but I was let down by the ending. I realize not all books have to end happy, but this was so sad at the end. I would have liked to see something with a little more hope. Still, good book that I enjoyed.

JungleFrog3 – Xronixle

Great Read (but how the hell do you say the title?) Boy meets girl. Boy and girl fall in love. Girl falls out of love, so boy makes a digital copy of girl, who turns into a cyber god bent on revenge. Just your typical teenage romance for the digital age, right? Aside from the title (which, seriously, how the hell would you pronounce that?), I really loved this book once I got going with it. The characters are beautifully drawn, if slightly annoying sometimes with their obsessions, and the representation of what life could be like a few years from now is eerie and resonant. The novel gets slightly repetitive in places, with X constantly revisiting and reliving scenes of his time with C, but that seems to be a deliberate choice on the part of the author. With our entire lives available for replay, it’s easy to fall into a loop, living in the past. I also had a slight issue with how quickly everyone falls into obsessive, “I would die for you” love, but they are all teenagers, so I guess it’s not that strange. One thing I did dislike is that one of the main characters, typically represented as a good guy, gets disturbingly rapey at one point. It’s never addressed afterwards, and there are no consequences for him. I know that that’s how things often play out in real life, but I feel like the author could have taken a stronger stance against it. I read this after Veneer, a novel by the same author, and when I realized it partway through my enjoyment of it definitely increased. If possible, I definitely recommend reading Veneer first, even though this comes earlier chronologically.

Jeba – Xronixle
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