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Tag: amwriting

Jack in the Coke

It’s a beautiful night for writing. Jack is in the Coke, treason is in the air, my fingers are in the mood to fly, and also Jack is in the Coke.

Hustle for that Flow

Sometimes I like to talk as if I know the first thing about how to write stories. I do it mostly to psyche myself up, to convince Inner Daniel that we know what we’re doing here and that everything is going to be alright. When morale is low, I try to focus on the things I know to be absolutes. One space after a period. Words go left to right. And my favorite: you gotta hustle for that flow. There’s no way around that last one. Trust me, I’ve looked for years.

And This is How I Revise

I don’t know anyone who enjoys revisions like I do. But then, I only know a few authors and they’re all that weird, tight-lipped kind of writer who doesn’t really want to talk about their “process” because either they’re not confident in their process or, more likely, they’re too confident in their process and they don’t want to give away trade secrets to little old me. Yes, this combative stance is why I don’t know more authors. Anyway, the alpha period on Hybrid Mechanics is finally up, so it’s time to get back at it! Here’s where we’ve been and where we’re going.

Maximum Overwrite

So I’m currently reading Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz. I watched the movie a few weeks ago and really enjoyed the universe Koontz created, so naturally I wanted to read the book and get all those extra details that are typically left out of movies. And though I’ve enjoyed reading, it doesn’t really feel like there is more story here. I have a guess about why that is.

In It For The Money

I’ve never paid much attention to the financial profit/loss aspect of independent publishing. I just don’t see the point. I know, generally, how much the royalty checks will be each month, and I know it doesn’t compare to the marketing and materials spend. One of the supposed advantages of indie publishing and print-on-demand was that it required very little in terms of upfront money. But what they didn’t tell me when I started in 2004 (because nobody knew) was that it does cost money to self-publish. A lot of money, it turns out. Sadly, for myself and a lot of writers, the dream isn’t to get rich on my novels; I just want to break even.

Time After Time

I’ve really taken a liking to non-linear narratives. When you think of all the ways you can mess with a reader, there’s nothing quite like the confusion you can create by having multiples stories operating on multiple timelines. Did A happen before B? Are they happening at the same time? And then later, when everything becomes clear, the reader is incented to re-read the entire book, because now it has taken on different meaning. Today, I was trying to figure out what had sparked this interest in time-confusion, and I realized it started long ago with movies like Pulp Fiction, but it wasn’t until I read Blake Crouch’s Wayward Pines that I was compelled to try it myself.

My 10 Greatest Achievements / Failures of 2017

As each year comes to a close, it’s important to look back on everything you’ve done in the last 365 days and tell yourself either good job or you suck. Because what is life without judgment, either internal or external? If you don’t grade yourself, how do you know if you’re #hashtag winning? Exactly. So here you go, 10 of my proudest achievements and 10 of my darkest moments of 2017.

Recent Reviews

Verastiqui has outdone himself In short, Perion Synthetics is unlike anything I’ve ever read. Verastiqui paints a not-too-distant future where your smart phone is embedded in your wrist, the word “feed” has become a transitive technoverb, and synthetic humanoids indistinguishable from you and I roam freely. Typical sci-fi tropes? On the surface, perhaps, but Verastiqui delves deeper into technological and political issues that you’ll find a little too familiar with what modern media is becoming. The story centers on the titular company and a cast of characters that weave a story of deceit, espionage, death, and other fast-paced plot elements I’ll leave tacit as not to spoil anything. To describe this book as a “page turner” would be a grave understatement. Curious if the author will address what will inevitably happen “behind closed doors” between fallible humans and synthetic beings of the opposite sex? The only answer you’re going to get from me is “you’re just going to have to read it for yourself.” If you’re familiar with the Verastiqui oeuvre, his storytelling elements in this book are omnipresent yet surprisingly fresh: wry humor, unapologetic grittiness, remarkable depth of character writing, loss of love and its ersatz replacement, rampant technology, and the megacorporation therein that may-or-may-not control all the information. If Perion Synthetics were to be compared to a film, it would be Blade Runner – written by Lars von Trier and directed by Sam Peckinpah. A by-the-book sci-fi story this is not; Verastiqui is a master of the cyber-punk genre and I dare anyone that knows Asimov from Orwell to disagree.

Scott Graber – Perion Synthetics

Another great book by Verastiqui. If you like science fiction to be the kind that seems truly possible, then read this book. A world where wars are fought by robots and where an expiring physical body can be exchanged for a semi-immortal ‘sleeve’ make this book truly thought provoking. The author does a great job combing drama, action, and philosophical questions, and his characters have flaws that bring out their humanity. There are many unpredictable plot twists that keep the surprises coming.

Todd Pruner – Por Vida
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui