Q:
How Long Do You Wait After Finishing a Book to Start The Next One?

Q: How Long Do You Wait After Finishing a Book to Start The Next One?

A: I don’t. Okay, I guess it depends on how you define “finishing” a book. For some, it’s when the book goes on sale and people start buying it. For me, it’s when I submit the book to my proofer for final polish. At that point, I’m done. There’s no more writing involved for that story, so I can safely start working on a new one.

I’m always confused by Novlr’s unAmerican numbering on dates.

Every couple of hours, someone on Twitter asks #WritingCommunity how many WIPs are you working on? The answer is invariably dozens, and every time I see someone say more than one, I roll my eyes, because they’re doing something that doesn’t fit my personal style and therefore it is wrong and stupid. Sometimes I just want to scream why do you have thirteen WIPs?! Just finish one of them. A published novel is worth more than thirteen unfinished WIPs, IMHO.

This is the only acceptable type of ad on my website.

I can’t work on multiple stories at one time. I can’t keep that much information straight in my head. More importantly, I want to finish a novel, and I want to do it sooner rather than later. If working on two (or more) projects means a longer gap between publishing books, then count me out.

My neighbor got a puppy, and I love it.

It was about this time last year that I first started writing Vise Manor. I had grand dreams of publishing it in time for Halloween this year, as the story takes place in October of 2021, Vinestead Time. I didn’t quite make it, but I was surprised to see that when I sat down to start a new project, the Created dates were similar. Putting out a novel per year seems like a lofty goal, but it might be doable unless I change jobs or have another child or emerge from quarantine and ah fart-monkeys.

I get my best ideas when I take Cheyenne for a walk.

I guess the real answer to this question is as soon as possible. For a typical novel, I only spend three or four months writing the first draft. The rest is, as I’ve said before, just work. As soon as I start rewrites, I start pining to write something fresh and new, something I’ve never seen before. But I have to be strong. One story after the other. This is the way.

Like his father before him, Matador’s current best friend is a free-spirited neighbor girl.

And as for the new book, my goal is to go full Louis Sachar and not tell you anything about it until it’s done. We’ll see how long that lasts…

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