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Baby Steps

I have become a FitBit. The most important thing in my life right now is counting the number of steps El Matador takes each day. Some days that number is two, or zero, or like the other day, seven. I can’t express how exciting this seemingly mundane task is to me. I know one day he’ll be running circles around me, but right now, this is amazing to watch, and honestly, I had no clue it would be.

It’s liberating to be so focused on the achievements of a fifteen-month-old child. My daily goals have been pretty much the same for the last several weeks: get El Matador to walk, and get him to talk. That’s it. Doesn’t matter that I didn’t exercise or write. Doesn’t matter what the president tweeted. It’s all about this little dude and his sick gains.

The above picture is one of the my favorites. One day, I’d like to be as talented a photographer as Dom, but in the meantime, I like to think I take the occasional “good” picture. Take photos of El Matador for Instagram with the rules of black and white and no faces really makes me think about how the photo is put together. I don’t know. I like it.

Published inParenthood

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