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Month: July 2018

Jack in the Coke

It’s a beautiful night for writing. Jack is in the Coke, treason is in the air, my fingers are in the mood to fly, and also Jack is in the Coke.

And This is How I Email

I went on a business trip this week to Maryland, home of the Marylanders, and in the course of setting up transportation and lodging and all of those other things, I had to give out my email address way too many times. But you know what, I hate giving out my email address. As an ardent opponent of advertising, I really hate spam. Like, really hate it. Thus, I needed a way to keep my personal email private while still giving companies a way to contact me. A few years ago, I figured out a relatively easy way to do it.

Naps of a Micro Nature

El Matador has begun taking micro-naps whenever the mood hits him. They only last 5 – 10 seconds before he’s up and at it again, but it’s still interesting to see him learning he can control his own downtime. I love this kid. Everything he does amazes me.

Recursion Therapy

Every company needs a wannabe programmer in a non-engineering role to help bridge the gap between available software offerings and company needs. I’ve been lucky enough to fill that role at Uplogix for a while now, and most of that time has been spent fighting the “cloud-based business software CRM” behemoth known as Netsuite. In fact, almost every app I’ve written has come from a Netsuite shortcoming, from tracking customer information to managing RMAs and so on. Recently, we tried to use Netsuite to compile an order history for a customer. Long story short, I had to write some code.

Recent Reviews

An imaginative page-turner Perion Synthetics is about robots, well really, a possible future world sprinkled with synthetic humans. It is also a story about secrets of a great corporation and the intergenerational change of leadership in a tightly held company. Just as it is a reality in 2014 to take Google autonomous cars without a human touching the controls as it drives from city to city, some of the robots in this book are entirely plausible, and could be logical extensions of stories we read about in today’s news. But then you turn a page and you have crossed into the implausible – these are state of the art augmentations and future synthetic human models. Buck Rogers space travel was equally unbelievable in 1928. Who is to say whether Verastiqui’s story is not the future path taken by research in artificial intelligence and material science when we look backward a hundred years from now? Each of six main characters is introduced in depth. As you read along, a complex multi-dimensional story emerges as you see the plot from each of the different perspectives. I accepted the story from Cameron’s point of view, until I read Cynthia’s and so on. It was like looking through a hexagon windowed display in a museum. The new angles allowed the reader to comprehensively see the complete story. Knowing there is no sequel yet and coming to the end of the story, ordinarily the reader might feel let-down, a bit like post partum blues, but not here. The author has kindly provided the antidote and frosting on the cake, by dishing up a coda for each character so you know what happens to them after the story concludes.

Jane Howard – Perion Synthetics

Another great book by Verastiqui. If you like science fiction to be the kind that seems truly possible, then read this book. A world where wars are fought by robots and where an expiring physical body can be exchanged for a semi-immortal ‘sleeve’ make this book truly thought provoking. The author does a great job combing drama, action, and philosophical questions, and his characters have flaws that bring out their humanity. There are many unpredictable plot twists that keep the surprises coming.

Todd Pruner – Por Vida
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui