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Month: March 2018

An Oral History of the Margate MESH

The more things change, the faster they change. At no time in our history was that more true than in the years between 2018 and 2026 when America and most of the civilized world was almost brought to a technological standstill by a group of hackers who valued privacy over regulation and freedom over democratically elected control. This is the story of how the Margate MESH brought us to the brink and how the men and women of this great country brought us back.

The Sum of Rewritten Memory

Ah, the Alpha Reader period, that month-long, self-enforced sabbatical from what is sure to be the next great American Science Fiction novel. Is there anything worse than trying to fill the days when all you want to do is continue working? I submit there is not. Sure, my son said his first word and learned how to climb the side of his crib, and sure there are unopened PS4 games on my shelf, and sure my yard needs attention, and sure I could keep this list going forever, but I want to write, dammit. And write I will, even if it’s something I’ve already written.

Love, Angst, and Marriage

Last week, at the ripe old age of 37, I got married. It was a small affair with family and friends, just west of Dripping Springs, Texas in the Hill Country. The weather had been rainy leading up to the day, but on Friday, the sun was shining and a cool breeze was blowing. Dominique was beautiful, the flowers were beautiful, and everyone we hired to play music and serve food did a great job. We danced the night away with friends and later, listened to stories from drunken family members as we sat around a fire. All of that was expected… what I didn’t expect was that in the course of writing my toast for the reception, I would finally nail down where my writing style came from.

Recent Reviews

Daniel Verastiqui’s best book yet. I have read a couple of his books before, and was graced with an advanced copy. Perion Synthetics is his best book yet. He follows different characters, giving you a well rounded view of the futuristic world through many different lenses, leaving you frantically reading for more, unable to put the book down. Throughout the whole book, you are not only entertained with an interesting story, but left with a nagging thought of what is truly a human soul vs artificial intelligence, and what are its rights. I have dismissed such conversations before, but Perion Synthetics presents some realistic issues we may face in the not too distant future. For those needing to know more specifics for youths reading it: There is explicit language, sex, and violence. This may not be a book for people under 16. But for science fiction readers who don’t mind that like I do, this book is a great read. I recommend it for anyone’s library.

Lauren Ellis – Perion Synthetics

Beauty is only skin deep… . . . or so the old adage goes and in Verastiqui’s “Veneer” it’s perhaps never been more true and more false at the same time. To understand why I feel this way, you’ll have to read the story though; I try to avoid spoilers of any sort in the reviews I offer. The premise for this tale while not entirely new, builds on the concepts popularized by William Gibson, or for the more graphically inclined, “The Matrix” series of movies. The main characters who drive the storyline are all young adults but the themes of the story do surpass that age group and I doubt that YA readers were the intended audience here, despite another reviewer’s indication that Amazon apparently recommended the book based upon other YA selections. There are themes within the story that some parents might hesitate to share with young children but I didn’t find that there was anything that would discomfit a well adjusted teen. The characters are all well developed and most readers will be able to recall someone in their own past that fits loosely into the general mold they initially portray; however, Verastiqui does a good job of developing the characters throughout the story and not letting the characters become caricatures of the various teen archetypes. In fact not only do the characters each have their unique voice within the story, Verastiqui develops a distinct narrative style for each of them that allows the readers to get a futher insight into the characters and their viewpoints on the experiences that shape the story. It’s subtle enough to not disrupt the flow of the narrative but to give each of the narrative styles a flavor that adds to the readers enjoyment. The pacing was good and the story itself intriguing, making it difficult to find a natural point at which to stop sometimes; I often found myself saying, “Just one more chapter and then I’ll sleep.” For those that read Verastiqui’s earlier book, “Xronixle,” there are tie-ins to that work as well and Verastiqui appears to have an overarching setting and/or timeline that these books take place in, much in the same fashion that Asimov had tie-ins between several of his works that were not otherwise initially related in content; think of the original “Foundation” series and the R. Daneel Olivaw stories. The two books though are self contained and you need not have read one to enjoy the other. For the full effect and to get the couple of inside or internal references, read “Xronixle” first and then “Veneer,” but don’t hesitate to read “Veneer” first if you’ve got access to it; you can always go back and read “Xronixle.” In short: I found this to be a good, well written story, that will likely leave you wanting more. Thankfully, it appears Verastiqui is already hard at work on another installment, so the wait will hopefully not be too long.

Nelson Kerr – Perion Synthetics
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui