Skip to content

The Vinestead Anthology

chris-lawton-236416
Photo by Chris Lawton on Unsplash

Today, I’m trying to understand what psychology of the series tag. You know, that whole template every budding indie writer seems to be following these days: The Novel Title (The Series Name, Book X). I understand why people who write series would want to tag their books so readers get them in the right order, but what if you write interconnected books that don’t go in any order? Can you still use the series tag? Does it add value, or will it ultimately hurt more than it helps?

Consider the change I made yesterday to the listing of Por Vida on Amazon:

daniel_books

Say you’re a new reader to my books (fat chance, I know you’ve got ’em all on your Kindle), if you saw the above on Amazon, would you:

  • See the word anthology and think unordered series of books taking place in the same universe?
  • Feel like you should seek out Book 1 and start there? (assuming the other books were properly labeled)
  • Not want to get invested because the series is already four books long (I felt this with the Dark Tower series)
  • Close the tab and go browse Reddit for a while

I’m torn between wanting to let people know these books are all connected (based on how excited I get when Stephen King mentions Derry in one of his books) and not wanting them to think its a true series that never finds an ending or that it needs to be read in a certain order.

So I ask you, fellow authors: If you were trying to market standalone novels that shared the same universe, would you use the series tag? Why / why not?

I’d ask my agent, but she lives in Canada. You wouldn’t know her.

Published inMarketing

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

Recent Reviews

Veneer is Snow Crash mixed with The Matrix mixed with Degrassi High… …if the kids of Degrassi Street swore and engaged in R-rated activities. I’ve been a fan of Verastiqui since reading his first novel, Xronixle, and I’m happy to say his sophomore effort is just as exciting and suspenseful, if not more. Veneer had me from the very first sentence, which if you read the preview you’ll get an idea of Verastiqui’s sense of humor. He masterfully blends elements of science fiction, the coming of age of adolescents, and a suspenseful story line with multiple twists that will make you laugh and question your reality at the same time. I found myself letting loose a hearty guffaw on one page, while on the very next page I was murmuring a “holy cow!” whilst raising my brow, which leads to those rare “I must finish this chapter” moments. While Veneer uses typical Cyberpunk themes (gritty technology gone awry, what-is-real-what-is-not-ness, evil ethereal-like corporations hell bent on the destruction of the protagonist), Verastiqui peppers in brilliantly-written sarcastic teenage characters that have the ability to change reality with their mind and, well, I can honestly say I’ve never read anything like it. An epic quest for redemption? Death? Sex? Check, check, check. The only reason I’m rating this 4 stars is because Verastiqui still has room to grow in his writing in order to be held in the same regard as upper echelon Cyberpunk authors like William Gibson and Neal Stevenson – a feat I wholeheartedly think he can achieve. Get this book. Related

KirbyLane7 – Veneer

Loved this book. Really interesting read – and the ‘veneer’ is fantastic. Author explains the concepts well and I found I was interested and compelled to read to the last page. Waiting for the next one! Related

Deanne Littlejohn – Veneer
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui