Skip to content

The Vinestead Anthology

chris-lawton-236416
Photo by Chris Lawton on Unsplash

Today, I’m trying to understand what psychology of the series tag. You know, that whole template every budding indie writer seems to be following these days: The Novel Title (The Series Name, Book X). I understand why people who write series would want to tag their books so readers get them in the right order, but what if you write interconnected books that don’t go in any order? Can you still use the series tag? Does it add value, or will it ultimately hurt more than it helps?

Consider the change I made yesterday to the listing of Por Vida on Amazon:

daniel_books

Say you’re a new reader to my books (fat chance, I know you’ve got ’em all on your Kindle), if you saw the above on Amazon, would you:

  • See the word anthology and think unordered series of books taking place in the same universe?
  • Feel like you should seek out Book 1 and start there? (assuming the other books were properly labeled)
  • Not want to get invested because the series is already four books long (I felt this with the Dark Tower series)
  • Close the tab and go browse Reddit for a while

I’m torn between wanting to let people know these books are all connected (based on how excited I get when Stephen King mentions Derry in one of his books) and not wanting them to think its a true series that never finds an ending or that it needs to be read in a certain order.

So I ask you, fellow authors: If you were trying to market standalone novels that shared the same universe, would you use the series tag? Why / why not?

I’d ask my agent, but she lives in Canada. You wouldn’t know her.

Published inMarketing

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

Recent Reviews

Exciting and unpredictable Daniel Verastiqui has an obsession with giving his characters great big heaping gobs of amazing technology, and then watching them screw themselves with it. Perion Synthetics takes that to a new level. James Perion, the Steve Jobsian titan of business and technology that built the world’s most innovative producer of synthetic humanoids from the ground up, is dying. And his life’s work is not yet done. The people closest to him all jockey for position while reporters from the world’s largest media houses each find different means to infiltrate the ultra-secret Perion City so they can find out just how far this dying man has gone toward the creation of truly synthetic life. It’s an exciting and unpredictable story with a large cast of characters, human and otherwise, that brings us back to the Vinestead universe of Daniel Verastiqui’s previous works. Check it out. Related

Travis Holmes – Perion Synthetics

I really enjoyed this book. I was worried as it started out great with the elementary school scene, and then started up with high school and I thought I hope this stays as good as it was. Thankfully it did. I loved it. I found the world that was created was really interesting and instead of a lot of long drawn out explanations of what things are and do, they are shown to the reader instead which I loved! I did like reading the different chapters from different characters POV, some evil people some good people some of everyone. I loved it. I really would like to read more. Related

Jennifer – Veneer
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui