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Month: February 2018

In It For The Money

I’ve never paid much attention to the financial profit/loss aspect of independent publishing. I just don’t see the point. I know, generally, how much the royalty checks will be each month, and I know it doesn’t compare to the marketing and materials spend. One of the supposed advantages of indie publishing and print-on-demand was that it required very little in terms of upfront money. But what they didn’t tell me when I started in 2004 (because nobody knew) was that it does cost money to self-publish. A lot of money, it turns out. Sadly, for myself and a lot of writers, the dream isn’t to get rich on my novels; I just want to break even.

Prepare Your Cortical Stack

It’s finally here. Netflix’s adaptation of Richard K. Morgan’s mind-blowing sci-fi novel Altered Carbon is now live, and though I’ll never forgive Joel Kinnaman for his part in the Robocop Reboot That Shall Never Be Mentioned Again, I can’t wait to binge the entire season this weekend. It’s hard to describe how awesome Altered Carbon is–if you’re into technology, explosions, and some of the l33t-est buzzwords you’ll ever read, this is the story for you.

Time After Time

I’ve really taken a liking to non-linear narratives. When you think of all the ways you can mess with a reader, there’s nothing quite like the confusion you can create by having multiples stories operating on multiple timelines. Did A happen before B? Are they happening at the same time? And then later, when everything becomes clear, the reader is incented to re-read the entire book, because now it has taken on different meaning. Today, I was trying to figure out what had sparked this interest in time-confusion, and I realized it started long ago with movies like Pulp Fiction, but it wasn’t until I read Blake Crouch’s Wayward Pines that I was compelled to try it myself.

Recent Reviews

(Disclaimer: Daniel provided me with a free advanced copy for feedback and review purposes.) To start with, I really appreciate receiving an advanced copy from the author. That was a first for me since I signed up with the program on Goodreads. On to the book review… I thought that Verastiqui created an interesting story line and developed the characters well. There were many times while reading it that I had a tough time putting the book down. It was an interesting concept: a great innovator is dying and tries to build a replacement that he can transfer his mind into. I liked this part of the book. What I didn’t like was how quickly the characters bought into some of topics brought up in the book. There were times that the characters made 180 degree shifts in beliefs without the turmoil that usually comes with it. It frustrated me that they changed their deep down beliefs without any concerns. At one point, one of the characters tries to kill the other and without any ‘making up’, they work together at the end. Personally, I have a tough time believing that someone that tried killing me a half hour earlier, can now be my best friend if there wasn’t something else that happened in the middle. That was a tough thing for me to get over and the only reason I dropped down the rating. Overall, it was worth a read and if you can get over some of the major shifts I mentioned, it was an enjoyable read.

Manoj – Perion Synthetics

Loved this book. Really interesting read – and the ‘veneer’ is fantastic. Author explains the concepts well and I found I was interested and compelled to read to the last page. Waiting for the next one!

Deanne Littlejohn – Veneer
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui