Skip to content

Month: February 2018

In It For The Money

I’ve never paid much attention to the financial profit/loss aspect of independent publishing. I just don’t see the point. I know, generally, how much the royalty checks will be each month, and I know it doesn’t compare to the marketing and materials spend. One of the supposed advantages of indie publishing and print-on-demand was that it required very little in terms of upfront money. But what they didn’t tell me when I started in 2004 (because nobody knew) was that it does cost money to self-publish. A lot of money, it turns out. Sadly, for myself and a lot of writers, the dream isn’t to get rich on my novels; I just want to break even.

Prepare Your Cortical Stack

It’s finally here. Netflix’s adaptation of Richard K. Morgan’s mind-blowing sci-fi novel Altered Carbon is now live, and though I’ll never forgive Joel Kinnaman for his part in the Robocop Reboot That Shall Never Be Mentioned Again, I can’t wait to binge the entire season this weekend. It’s hard to describe how awesome Altered Carbon is–if you’re into technology, explosions, and some of the l33t-est buzzwords you’ll ever read, this is the story for you.

Time After Time

I’ve really taken a liking to non-linear narratives. When you think of all the ways you can mess with a reader, there’s nothing quite like the confusion you can create by having multiples stories operating on multiple timelines. Did A happen before B? Are they happening at the same time? And then later, when everything becomes clear, the reader is incented to re-read the entire book, because now it has taken on different meaning. Today, I was trying to figure out what had sparked this interest in time-confusion, and I realized it started long ago with movies like Pulp Fiction, but it wasn’t until I read Blake Crouch’s Wayward Pines that I was compelled to try it myself.

Recent Reviews

Fast paced techno book allows you to feel half a dozen hearts Really Enjoyed this book. It has great pacing, as fast as the technology that drives this world, snappy as a keyboard. The way this book moves through the story is unique; as you leap frog through the story, the author tricks you, deceives you, then hands you what you knew the whole time. ½ Mystery, ½ Cyberpunk. Bladerunner meets Foundation. The characters are real, lively and snarky. There’s humor in here, in there’s some horror. For a moment I thought there was going to be a zombie apocalypse. Moreover, its well written. I’m a big fan of Michael Moorcock’s long winded weaving of linguistic tapestries that stop the story where it’s at while the scene is created… That’s not happening here. Technology doesn’t have time for you to look around, you better take it in as you move, and that’s exactly what the author produces. The ending felt a little chopped, but probably because I wanted more. Good job, off to try another.

Matthew Prasse – Perion Synthetics

A really enjoyable piece of near-future sci-fi. The premise of this book is fairly simple – somewhere in the fairly near future, society has collapsed and rebuilt itself with the addition of the “veneer”, the supposedly innate ability of the people to shape their world to look like whatever they want it to look like. When a young man starts to see underneath the veneer, he starts on a track that leads him to attempt to take down the system. Helping him are his girlfriend and best friend; against him, an entire system of secret agents, plus his childhood nemesis. The main question here is an interesting one. What would the world be like if we could shape it to suit our desires, like we can online now? The veneer is a means of control for the corporations – things look pretty, so no one questions what the world is like without it. A single corrupt company essentially controls the world, and their agents enforce the control using deadly force, if necessary. The young characters are well drawn and strongly motivated, whether they’re good or evil. I do have some issues with how the author treats homosexuality, but overall I was really engaged by the writing and the book as a whole.

Jeba – Veneer
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui