Skip to content

The Dallas Cowboys and The Domain

1356m

I didn’t understand The Domain here in Austin when it was first built. Who the hell would travel all the way up MoPac just to go to Macy’s? Now, it’s the place to be, growing larger every day, and it’s home to some great restaurants and an aging iPic theater. We don’t go there often though, and it’s for one reason: parking. That brings me to my thesis: Parking at The Domain is a lot like the Cowboys going to the Super Bowl.

Every time you decide to go to The Domain, you think, maybe this time (season), it will be different! Maybe things will go my way and I’ll find a parking spot (not get eliminated in the first round of the playoffs). But no, there’s always a Tony Romo parked in the middle of the street with their flasher on waiting for people to finish getting into their car and leave. And even when you do see a spot, by the time you get to it, the defense has fallen apart and given up an easy 6.

The worst part is that you know finding a parking spot is possible. You remember the good old days when you found a parking spot three times, in 1993, in 1994, and in 1996. What happened in 1995? No one’s quite sure. Maybe there was a Lexus taking up two spots.

Ultimately, you end up parking in the garage (not making the playoffs) and sneering past all the Maseratis (Patriots) in their prime parking spots as you make your way to Sprinkles Cupcakes ATM to buy your fiancee some cupcakes because she’s been craving them and you’re a standup dude.

sp_bh_atm-03

Published inGeneral

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

Recent Reviews

Verastiqui is back and better than ever . . . I was fortunate enough to receive an advance copy of Perion Synthetics, this soon to be released novel set in the Vinestead series. While this latest release is a stand alone novel, like those that have come before it, readers familiar with his earlier work will notice references to familiar names, places and entities. None of these references though take away from Perion Synthetics in any way or slow the momentum of this newest addition to Verastiqui’s mythos. You’ll find the same strong character development that marked his earlier novels and a story that quickly pulls you in and builds in momentum all the way through the conclusion. Be prepared to read large swathes at once as there are few good points to stop and catch your breath once you’ve gotten started. Perion Synthetics takes a much more hard science fiction approach to a number of key elements of the story. Verastiqui’s vision for our near future is both startling in it’s complexity and in the very believable possibility that many of the things that his characters take for granted as parts of their daily lives, may easily find their way off the pages and into our own in the not so distant future. It is this perhaps more than anything that distinguishes this novel from some of his earlier work. Having read each novel in the Vinestead collection, I can honestly say, I can’t wait for the next installment. Related

Nelson Kerr – Perion Synthetics

Fantastic story-telling! Interesting concept, intricate plot, great characters, fabulous dry humor, and plenty of action. The general idea is a somewhat familiar one in sci-fi, but this was a different, fresh take on the idea of artificial intelligence that I found quite thought-provoking. I really like how this book is tied in to Verastiqui’s previous writings without technically being a sequel- the books take place in the same universe, and there are a few nods to previous books, but I don’t feel it’s necessary to have read the others to understand this one. He gives just enough background detail for a first-time reader to visualize the world- there wasn’t that “recap” section in the beginning I felt like I could skip like in other serial novels. I really enjoyed the characters in this book. Without giving spoilers, one of my favorite things about this author’s writing is that the characters seem real. They are flawed, insightful, altruistic, selfish, and complicated. It’s never immediately obvious who the “good guys” are, because every character has both good and questionable morals. Because the characters are rich and realistic, their actions (or the things that happened to them) were often surprising while still fitting logically with the storyline. I thought the pacing and shifting perspectives were very nicely done in this novel. Several of the sections ended with a cliffhanger. The sections that followed tended to slow the pace a bit to give more backstory, and then quickly got back to the resolution of the previous section. I managed to avoid skimming ahead (as I usually do) to find out “what happened to so-and-so” because each character shift was so interesting. I highly recommend this book- the writing will draw you in, it’s highly entertaining, and the concept is fascinating! Related

Jen Doyle – Perion Synthetics
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui