Skip to content

Wake or Be Woken

Wake or Be Woken

It’s never too early to start freaking out about having to write a book description that will somehow magically convince people they need to read my latest Science Fictional opus. I have never, not once, written a book description that I was happy with. Instead, I write something the day it goes live on Amazon and hope for the best. Probably not the best marketing tactic, but whatever. For book 5, I’m looking to get a jump on that madness.

I sat down this morning and told myself there was no way I was going to get anywhere near a book description. Instead, I just started writing some garbage. Then I paused, hit Enter a few times, and wrote more garbage. I did that for about half an hour. Here’s what that produced:

The year is 2017. Donald Trump is President. Mass murders are commonplace. Nazis are back. The world balances on the precipice of nuclear war. Most people agree: reality is completely out of control.

But it’s not all bad news.

As it happens, none of it is real.

The world as you know it is actually a simulation centered around the city of Austin, Texas, and more specifically, four of its residents. There is nothing special about them on the surface; one’s a manager at a tech startup, another is a former soldier who drives for Brinks, the sole female is a moderately famous YouTube personality, and the fourth is a day-trader who is making a killing with Bitcoin.

They’re just normal people living out what they believe are normal lives.

But in reality—that is, actual reality—they are all dreaming, hooked into a collective delusion set in the Live Music Capital of the World.

For almost four decades, they have enjoyed American life at the dawn of the 21st century. But now it is time to wake up.

How will they feel when they learn everything they’ve ever known is a lie? Will they tell themselves they knew it all along? Will they abandon their faith and embrace chaos? Or will they use the opportunity to make a fresh start as someone else?

Only time, vicious infighting, and the threat of death at the hands of synthetic killing machines will tell for sure.

Does this adequately describe what Hybrid Mechanics is about? Not really. It’s one aspect of a multi-faceted story, the idea that we’re all living in a simulation. I really want that idea to be in the book description because I don’t want readers to think it was all a simulation is some kind of twist.

It’s not a twist.

It’s a starting point.

After that, comes the how, why, where, and when. The real question is whether the characters can survive long enough to answer even one of those questions.

Oooh, mystery.

/sigh/

Someone should take my blog away.

2017-12-13 09.41.30
WIP Update: Crossed 100,000 word mark on December 2017.12.14.
Published inMarketing

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

Recent Reviews

Beauty is only skin deep… . . . or so the old adage goes and in Verastiqui’s “Veneer” it’s perhaps never been more true and more false at the same time. To understand why I feel this way, you’ll have to read the story though; I try to avoid spoilers of any sort in the reviews I offer. The premise for this tale while not entirely new, builds on the concepts popularized by William Gibson, or for the more graphically inclined, “The Matrix” series of movies. The main characters who drive the storyline are all young adults but the themes of the story do surpass that age group and I doubt that YA readers were the intended audience here, despite another reviewer’s indication that Amazon apparently recommended the book based upon other YA selections. There are themes within the story that some parents might hesitate to share with young children but I didn’t find that there was anything that would discomfit a well adjusted teen. The characters are all well developed and most readers will be able to recall someone in their own past that fits loosely into the general mold they initially portray; however, Verastiqui does a good job of developing the characters throughout the story and not letting the characters become caricatures of the various teen archetypes. In fact not only do the characters each have their unique voice within the story, Verastiqui develops a distinct narrative style for each of them that allows the readers to get a futher insight into the characters and their viewpoints on the experiences that shape the story. It’s subtle enough to not disrupt the flow of the narrative but to give each of the narrative styles a flavor that adds to the readers enjoyment. The pacing was good and the story itself intriguing, making it difficult to find a natural point at which to stop sometimes; I often found myself saying, “Just one more chapter and then I’ll sleep.” For those that read Verastiqui’s earlier book, “Xronixle,” there are tie-ins to that work as well and Verastiqui appears to have an overarching setting and/or timeline that these books take place in, much in the same fashion that Asimov had tie-ins between several of his works that were not otherwise initially related in content; think of the original “Foundation” series and the R. Daneel Olivaw stories. The two books though are self contained and you need not have read one to enjoy the other. For the full effect and to get the couple of inside or internal references, read “Xronixle” first and then “Veneer,” but don’t hesitate to read “Veneer” first if you’ve got access to it; you can always go back and read “Xronixle.” In short: I found this to be a good, well written story, that will likely leave you wanting more. Thankfully, it appears Verastiqui is already hard at work on another installment, so the wait will hopefully not be too long. Related

Nelson Kerr – Perion Synthetics

Fantastic! It’s been a long time since I experience a “can’t put it down” book. I couldn’t put this one down. One part science fiction, one part psychological thriller, and 100% edge of your seat thrill ride. The characters are complex and delightful. The plot is well thought out and solid. The little clues along the way… little things that made me roll my eyes at the continuity error… Let’s just say when it suddenly makes sense, it’s like a kick in the gut (and I mean that in a very good way). Related

Sydnie Macelroy – Por Vida
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui