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Wherein I Choose a Car?

As mentioned in Wherein I Go Car Shopping, I’ve been in the market for a new car after three years of driving a wonderfully capable but not overly fun Nissan Rogue. I ended the previous post with the intention of driving a couple more cars before making a decision. I got halfway through that plan before I crowned a winner, and that car is…

The 2018 Hyundai Sonata Limited 2.0t. Probably.

2018 Hyundai Sonata Limited 2.0t

At an MSRP of $33k, the Sonata was outside my budget, and honestly what got me to the dealership was the Hyundai Sport 2.0t at a much more reasonable $27k. Throughout my search, I kept running into the same problem, which is best expressed in a familiar diagram:

Fast Full-Featured Affordable

The Nissan Maxima is fast and affordable, but only at lower trims, which are sparse on features like Forward Collision Warning, Adaptive Cruise Control, and Lane-keep Assist. If you want those, expect to pay around 42k. Meanwhile, the Mazda6 is loaded with features, is affordable at 27k, but maxes out with a four-cylinder 184-hp engine.

The Sonata is the ultimate compromise between affordability, speed, and features. It doesn’t have a V6, but the 2.0L 4cyl Turbo engine puts out 245 horsepower. The MSRP is within haggling distance of a sensible $30k, and the feature list is unmatched (in my search, anyway).

2018 Hyunda Sonata Butt Shot

Here are some of the things you get in the Limited 2.0t:

  • Forward Collision Warning with Emergency Braking
  • Adaptive Cruise Control
  • Lane Departure Warning with Lane-keep Assist
  • Blind Spot Monitoring
  • Keyless entry, push-button start, remote start (via iPhone app)
  • Backup camera
  • Electronic parking break with Auto Hold (no more holding the brake at red lights)
  • An overeager trunk that opens by itself for some reason
  • Sunroof
  • Auto-dimming rearview mirror with garage door openers
  • Heated and cooled seats
  • Dual climate controls

The features in bold are the ones I cared about most, especially the Forward Collision Warning and Blind Spot Monitoring. I’m not sure why you would build a car without a rearview camera anymore, and I’m not turning a physical key like some kind of neanderthal. Okay, I would if I had to, but I wouldn’t be happy about it, man.

Unlike the 2018 Toyota Camry, I find the Sonata’s center stack to be well-organized and engaging.

2018 Hyundai Sonata Inside

It’s got everything you need, like an unobtrusive navigation / entertainment area, simple environmental controls, and these cool little piano keys that give your fingers a break from tapping screens all day. It’s got a couple of 12V plugs at the bottom that you could easily drop a double Anker power supply into and end up with 5 USB charging ports.

Anecdote: During the test drive, I sat back in the driver’s seat with hands off the wheel and foot off the pedals and watched as the Sonata drove itself around a curved section of I-35. It’s not a self-driving Tesla, but it was still pretty surreal.

I’ve still got a couple months before I can go pick up this surprisingly awesome Hyundai Sonata, which means I get to keep fielding calls and texts from the 10 dealerships I’ve visited over the last couple months. It’s interesting how different the salespeople have been, from the bro-douches to the My boyfriend drives this BMW to my favorite: the hands-off, no pressure, let me know if you have any questions salesperson.

I met two of them, so if you’re in the market for a new car, go see Jamison at Round Rock Mazda and Rick at Round Rock Hyundai.

Speaking of calls and texts, here’s one I got yesterday.

Round Rock Nissan Text

Round Rock Nissan, keeping it classy.

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