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I Should Be Writing

For some reason, I’m under the impression that if I’ve written and sent out a chapter in the last day or two, then I’m under no obligation to use my free time to write. Instead, I purchased a new domain and set up a new blog here at deadlineavoidance.com. I’m not sure why I set up a new blog–none of them have ever panned out in the past–but it’s here now and I’m going to talk about writing and publishing and how much my son poops. He is almost three months old. You will know him as El Matador.

I should explain (about the chapters, not El Matador). As with my previous novel, Por Vida, I’m using TinyLetter to send out chapters of my new book as I write them. It was a lot of fun the first time around. There’s nothing quite like getting instant feedback when you introduce a twist in the story. I’ve got less of an idea of where the story is going this time, but the feeling of it is there.

Reality. Hyperreality. Simulations. The Multiverse.

Lots of interesting ideas that evoke a feeling inside me. If I can take that feeling and wrap it up in a hardcore romance/cyberpunk blend, then we’ll have a new book to pimp on Facebook.

Until then, I’ll be here, avoiding the next deadline in a life-long, self-imposed series of deadlines.

 

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Recent Reviews

Lovely Novel by an Author that Shows Great Potential I was lucky enough to have been given a free copy of this book through Goodreads: First Reads, and did not purchase this novel. First off, I will say that I did enjoy this book quite a bit. It was pretty original, and Daniel Verastiqui did a lovely job of creating an intriguing, futuristic setting for the story. The characters were realistic and easy to relate to, which definitely made me wish to read more about them, even after I finished the book. Beautifully written, the story hooked me from the first page and kept me interested until the very end. I’ve read my fair share of sci-fi futuristic novels, though not many of them have pleased me as much as this one did. Daniel Verastiqui certainly has a knack for writing for this genre, and in my opinion, has some much-needed creativity that many other authors lack. For this kind of book to work, and be enjoyable, the author has to both be imaginative and able to bring their thoughts to the pages. Luckily, this author can do both of these things quite well. But, despite the book’s greatness, it also had a few things that require improvement. One of those things is language. The author curses many times over the course of this novel, despite the fact that he really doesn’t have to. This gives some of the writing an immature feel, and was slightly annoying to have to read. Also, Daniel Verastiqui used the words “reconciled” and “veneer” WAY too many times during the course of the book. I understood that they were part of the world he created, but I felt as though he could have swapped them out a few times to seem less redundant. Grammar and spelling was great, and I found only a typo or two in the entire book. The formatting was good, and the author used nice sentence structures that kept the story flowing smoothly. The vocabulary used was irritatingly advanced at times, however, for the most part, it was good. There was little confusion or jumps in the storyline, and the ending was crafted beautifully, which makes me hope that there will be sequel coming soon. Overall, I read the book in record time, and was quite pleased with it. I will certainly be looking into reading more of the author’s books, and will be giving this to a few of my friends for them to read. I would recommend this novel to any fan of futuristic novels or stories involving advanced technology and its consequences. Any fan of Sci-fi and action would probably enjoy this book as much as I have. Veneer is certainly worth reading, and I am happy the author gave me the opportunity to read and review it. Related

Katie Bearor – Veneer

Beauty is only skin deep… . . . or so the old adage goes and in Verastiqui’s “Veneer” it’s perhaps never been more true and more false at the same time. To understand why I feel this way, you’ll have to read the story though; I try to avoid spoilers of any sort in the reviews I offer. The premise for this tale while not entirely new, builds on the concepts popularized by William Gibson, or for the more graphically inclined, “The Matrix” series of movies. The main characters who drive the storyline are all young adults but the themes of the story do surpass that age group and I doubt that YA readers were the intended audience here, despite another reviewer’s indication that Amazon apparently recommended the book based upon other YA selections. There are themes within the story that some parents might hesitate to share with young children but I didn’t find that there was anything that would discomfit a well adjusted teen. The characters are all well developed and most readers will be able to recall someone in their own past that fits loosely into the general mold they initially portray; however, Verastiqui does a good job of developing the characters throughout the story and not letting the characters become caricatures of the various teen archetypes. In fact not only do the characters each have their unique voice within the story, Verastiqui develops a distinct narrative style for each of them that allows the readers to get a futher insight into the characters and their viewpoints on the experiences that shape the story. It’s subtle enough to not disrupt the flow of the narrative but to give each of the narrative styles a flavor that adds to the readers enjoyment. The pacing was good and the story itself intriguing, making it difficult to find a natural point at which to stop sometimes; I often found myself saying, “Just one more chapter and then I’ll sleep.” For those that read Verastiqui’s earlier book, “Xronixle,” there are tie-ins to that work as well and Verastiqui appears to have an overarching setting and/or timeline that these books take place in, much in the same fashion that Asimov had tie-ins between several of his works that were not otherwise initially related in content; think of the original “Foundation” series and the R. Daneel Olivaw stories. The two books though are self contained and you need not have read one to enjoy the other. For the full effect and to get the couple of inside or internal references, read “Xronixle” first and then “Veneer,” but don’t hesitate to read “Veneer” first if you’ve got access to it; you can always go back and read “Xronixle.” In short: I found this to be a good, well written story, that will likely leave you wanting more. Thankfully, it appears Verastiqui is already hard at work on another installment, so the wait will hopefully not be too long. Related

Nelson Kerr – Perion Synthetics
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