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Reconciling a new Veneer

In my novel Veneer, residents of Easton live with a shared layer of augmented reality that covers almost every imaginable surface. To change the color or design of an object, they simply have to reach out, touch it, and imagine something different, a process I named reconciliation. I find it fitting that a reader looked at the cover of Veneer, imagined something different, and decided to reconcile something new. Sure, the technology is vastly different, but the result is the same.

I stumbled upon the website of Justin Pérez, a graphic designer and fellow University of Texas at Austin grad (hook ‘em!), during the third hour of my daily Google search for mentions of my books. Imagine my surprise when I discovered he had redesigned the cover for Veneer.

I reached out to Justin to let him know how much I liked the new cover and to ask about the circumstances surrounding the redesign.

The prompt for the project in my graphic design class instructed us to redesign an album or book cover. I chose Veneer for several reasons. The main reason being that I found the book interesting. Secondly, because the book was relevant […] to today’s discussions regarding emerging technologies and their societal affects.

When I went to UT, I remember sitting in 20th Century Short Stories thinking about whether my stories would ever be discussed the same way we were discussing The Yellow Wallpaper. Since I don’t write short stories anymore, and since UT is not likely to add a 21st Century Erotic Dystopian Cyber-Thriller Novels class anytime soon, I guess I’ll have to settle for Veneer showing up in a graphic design class elsewhere on campus.

What are the odds that a UT grad writes a novel that a UT student discovers years later and uses for a class project? You see, Professor Ghose? My stories did go somewhere.

I am and will likely always be hopeless when it comes to cover design. Using Jonathan Foerster’s Sonnet artwork as the cover for Veneer seemed like a great idea at the time. The imagery matched up well with the scene where Rosalia describes her nightmare to Deron. But all I did was slap a title and a name on pre-existing artwork. Despite how awesome Sonnet looks as a standalone piece, the final product didn’t feel like a real cover. Later, when I hired Lauren Ellis to do the Perion Synthetics cover, I realized that this kind of thing is better left to the professionals.

If you’re wondering what goes on in the mind of a designer:

I wanted to incorporate several elements from the book’s plot, but also keep the cover as minimal as possible. For the redesign, I decided to include a piece of fabric as the main backdrop for the cover. It is meant to represent the veil/veneer AR technology can create. The fabric slowly transitions from red (representing Rosalia) to black & white (alluding to Deron’s inability to perceive the veneer). The fonts are sans serif to echo the futuristic tone of the book.

Naturally, I had to share the redesign with my friends.

Sunshine said, ooh! That cover makes it look like “adult” reading.

Elizabeth added, That was my first thought too. Veneer meets 50 shades, coming to a book store near you. Lol.

LOL indeed, Elizabeth. Though, according to some reviews, Veneer is already 50 Shades. So I guess Justin’s cover does indeed, as he puts it on his website, “more accurately represent the book’s plot.”


It turns out that Justin and I share the same trepidation about the potential downsides of augmented reality. Veneer takes it to an extreme, but in the next five to ten years, we’re likely going to see advances in AR that have significant impact on how we interact. You thought people got lost in Second Life or World of Warcraft? Imagine how bad it will be when they’re actually there. Or at least, when they think they are.

I guess we’ll just have to wait and see.

Big thanks to Justin for choosing my book for his project. Authors are often crippled by self-doubt, so it’s refreshing to see someone discover my book and enjoy it enough to want to make new art with it.

Head over to Justin’s website at justinperezdesign.com and check out his other work. If you decide to hire him for a project, just make sure it’s done by the end of the year. I’m gonna need him for the cover of my next book!

Then maybe, just maybe, another UT student will redesign it five or six years from now.

We’ll see.

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Recent Reviews

Daniel Verastiqui’s best book yet. I have read a couple of his books before, and was graced with an advanced copy. Perion Synthetics is his best book yet. He follows different characters, giving you a well rounded view of the futuristic world through many different lenses, leaving you frantically reading for more, unable to put the book down. Throughout the whole book, you are not only entertained with an interesting story, but left with a nagging thought of what is truly a human soul vs artificial intelligence, and what are its rights. I have dismissed such conversations before, but Perion Synthetics presents some realistic issues we may face in the not too distant future. For those needing to know more specifics for youths reading it: There is explicit language, sex, and violence. This may not be a book for people under 16. But for science fiction readers who don’t mind that like I do, this book is a great read. I recommend it for anyone’s library. Related

Lauren Ellis – Perion Synthetics

A really enjoyable piece of near-future sci-fi. The premise of this book is fairly simple – somewhere in the fairly near future, society has collapsed and rebuilt itself with the addition of the “veneer”, the supposedly innate ability of the people to shape their world to look like whatever they want it to look like. When a young man starts to see underneath the veneer, he starts on a track that leads him to attempt to take down the system. Helping him are his girlfriend and best friend; against him, an entire system of secret agents, plus his childhood nemesis. The main question here is an interesting one. What would the world be like if we could shape it to suit our desires, like we can online now? The veneer is a means of control for the corporations – things look pretty, so no one questions what the world is like without it. A single corrupt company essentially controls the world, and their agents enforce the control using deadly force, if necessary. The young characters are well drawn and strongly motivated, whether they’re good or evil. I do have some issues with how the author treats homosexuality, but overall I was really engaged by the writing and the book as a whole. Related

Jeba – Veneer
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