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Month: February 2016

The Infinity Push-up Challenge

Scientific studies suggest that the number of push-ups you can do correlates to how much money you’ll earn, how many people love you, and how many grocery bags you can carry in one trip. Not only that, push-ups hit all the important muscle groups: biceps, triceps, and even the little-known diceps. And nothing fills out an Abercrombie v-neck like a cartoonishly large set of traps, just ask All-American sportsman Steve “Stone Cold” Austin.

Recent Reviews

A really enjoyable piece of near-future sci-fi. The premise of this book is fairly simple – somewhere in the fairly near future, society has collapsed and rebuilt itself with the addition of the “veneer”, the supposedly innate ability of the people to shape their world to look like whatever they want it to look like. When a young man starts to see underneath the veneer, he starts on a track that leads him to attempt to take down the system. Helping him are his girlfriend and best friend; against him, an entire system of secret agents, plus his childhood nemesis. The main question here is an interesting one. What would the world be like if we could shape it to suit our desires, like we can online now? The veneer is a means of control for the corporations – things look pretty, so no one questions what the world is like without it. A single corrupt company essentially controls the world, and their agents enforce the control using deadly force, if necessary. The young characters are well drawn and strongly motivated, whether they’re good or evil. I do have some issues with how the author treats homosexuality, but overall I was really engaged by the writing and the book as a whole.

Jeba – Veneer

Incredible futuristic cautionary tale. I received a free copy of this book through Goodreads: First Reads. I really enjoyed Veneer quite a bit. It was very original and Daniel Verastiqui has created a realistic and very futuristic setting for the story. The characters really came alive due to Verastiqui’s eloquent writing and apparent insight into the minds of teenagers. The book isn’t a casual read but it’s well worth learning the lingo used in the book because it’s a very compelling story. As a cautionary tale for what might come in our future, it’s chilling—but also hopeful since having the Veneer technology would be really wonderful–and dangerous in the wrong hands. Technology often presents a double edged sword. There’s violence in this book and it’s a testament to Verastiqui’s skills that you feel so bad for the victims. The violent scenes are used to demonstrate the dangers of this future world and it works. You really wonder whether it’s better to buy-in or scram and go back to nature. This is an incredible book, and the paperback version has an amazing cover. I love the graphic design. It’s a true work of art.

David Ketelsen – Veneer
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui