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Month: December 2013

Stealing Roberta

It’s generally not a good idea to use real people in your stories. As awesome as it would be to have Natalie Portman fighting cybernetic dinosaurs on a dinghy in the South Pacific, she probably wouldn’t be too thrilled to find out about it when your cross-genre erotic fanfic blows up like you just know it will. Profiting from a real person’s likeness (whether they’re an actor or a model or a local anchorwoman) may even get you sued.

Recent Reviews

Changed my views on writing good characters. I loved every single thing about this book. It was seamless, well-orchestrated, well-researched, the lingo was slick (unlike a lot of harder science fiction), the characters, the cities. AHh! It was just so very well put together like an intricate puzzle and worked out perfectly in the end. The most powerful part, for me, is how it’s changed my views on how to write a good character. perhaps it’s because I was just reading a poor example this evening, but I realized that what a character looks like is inconsequential MOST of the time, and yet so many writers drag on and on about it. Veneer changed that for me because the *veneer* is the important part. I can’t say much without giving away spoilers, but hopefully you’ll experience that shift as well. Highly recommended. And one aside, I didn’t notice if this was intended as a young adult novel, but the main characters are about 17 years old. There is crude language, violence, and sex. Just a heads up if that’s not your thing, or you don’t want *your* young adults reading that.

Amy Cox – Veneer

The Possible Future. Really enjoyed this book by Daniel Verastiqui. The future Verastiqui paints is one that feels not far from the realm of the possible. Of course this future world is still controlled by two super-corporations, but simulated human technology has begun to blur the lines between the artificial and the real. The book brings up fascinating ethical questions that could arise as machines become more and more like living beings. As the plot moves forward it becomes more and more apparent that at some point mankinds’ creations could begin to operate outside of the control of humans, and it’s a scary but interesting world to consider. I’ve read Verastiqui’s other books, and I really like how he ties the characters, corporations, and events to each other from book to book. One can easily begin to believe the the mega-corporations of tomorrow could easily look like Vinestead and Perion Synthetics.

Todd Pruner – Perion Synthetics
© 2018 Daniel Verastiqui